Vegan

Vegan Yellow Squash Lasagna

I start by making a big batch of cashew vegan cheese. Soaking the cashews overnight with multiple drain/rinse/add fresh water cycles gives it a milder flavor that I prefer. 4 cups of soaked cashews with a cup of water and 1/4 cup of lemon juice blended smooth. You can salt and pepper if you like or spice it up. It’ll be creamy and heavy, giving weight to the lasagna.

I sautee onions with garlic, ginger and cilantro in olive oil, then add diced red and green peppers. I used all six of my yellow squash. Cut up and added to the sautee on high heat. A little water, salt and aminos for moisture. When they cook down and soften a bit, I put in the spaghetti sauce and spinach. If I’d had a bag of vegan crumbles on hand, I’d have dumped them in too. Lower heat and stir until well cooked and combined.

Organic lasagna noodles al dente, as I don’t want them to fall apart and they will finish during the bake. I layer the noodles first, then the red filling and a layer of the vegan cheese. The repeat. In this case, I cut a block of firm tofu as it’s own layer. Topped with red filling and sprinkled with vegan parm. Bake for an hour or the top slightly browned.

Meatless Meatballs, Beefless Tips

Transition towards a vegan diet was bumpy for me. I had always liked cooking meat. I enjoyed BBQs on the rooftop in Brooklyn and eating ribs in both texas and memphis. Finding something to cook around that felt satisfying was hard. I didn’t really want to eat more processed foods or fake meats. I felt stuck.

A few Gardein products have helped my transition. The Meatless Meatballs and the Beefless Tips are two that I cook with regularly. I use them in vegan stews, curries and pasta sauces along with lots of vegetables. Good flavor, good texture, and something that feels like it sticks to your ribs.

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Cancer Vegan

I am a cancer vegan. A reluctant vegan. An imperfect vegan prone to meat-lapses. Vegan because there is some research that suggest being vegan lowers the chance for cancer to return. I’m not a political vegan or a moral vegan. I’m relieved that veganism is environmentally friendly, but I wasn’t a vegan before I got cancer. Strangely, I don’t even think it’s important that I survive cancer. I believe it will come back and kill me, nevertheless, I’m a kind of vegan, a cancer vegan.

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